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Dear Board Certified Doc, Thank You.

Friday, June 30, 2017

There are quite a few things I haven't yet shared about on the blog that I'm looking forward to sharing soon.  Bennett's issues have taken so much attention this year that, until recently, I hadn't had the emotional energy to post them.  But as Bennett's health continues to do well, life is much more balanced for me and now I can once again excitedly sharing several projects I've been a part of for some time.  This is one of them:


The American Board of Pediatrics is based in Chapel Hill, NC
Last year, I was invited to participate in some patient advocacy work with the American Board of Pediatrics.  The American Board of Pediatrics has recently taken steps towards incorporating more patient and family voices in its work.  As a part of that process, I was among a group of parents of pediatric patients invited to provide feedback to the American Board of Pediatrics and to gain greater understanding of the pediatric board certification process.

Growing up as a daughter of a board certified family physician, I've always felt that board certification was important.  I've also always known that board certification takes a lot of effort. I grew up having seen my dad, at times throughout his career, take time away from our family to further educate himself and pass his board certification exams.

But, beyond that, I had never given board certification any other thought, not as my role as a parent and not as my role as a parent of a child with chronic medical needs...that is, until I was invited to participate in some of the work going on at the American Board of Pediatrics.

It was during my work at the American Board of Pediatrics that I learned more about the board certification process and about what doctors (most specifically pediatricians) go through as an effort to give their patients the best care possible.

Patients and Families Meeting Attendees and some ABP staff at the American Board of Pediatrics


I remember when Brian and I first chose a pediatrician.  I was pregnant with our firstborn Oliver.  I had just moved to town so I used the recommendation of my dear friend Chelsea.  It turns out he was a great pediatrician.  However, I never once thought to find out if my doctor was board certified.

Years later when choosing specialists for Bennett's CF care, I never once questioned whether his doctors were board certified.  Why would I?  I just assumed they were...they have to be, right?!

To my surprise, what I learned at the American Board of Pediatrics Patients and Families Meeting is that, although all doctors have to be licensed by law, not all doctors have to be board certified.

When doctors graduate from medical school and residency, they must apply for a state license.  Once they are licensed, they are considered to be able to practice medicine for as long as they do not get their license revoked.

Board certified doctors, however, are those who already have a license but have gone further.  They are those doctors who, on top of being licensed with the state, have demonstrated competencies in several areas by way of studying and taking exams as presented to them by their board certifying body.

There are many board certifying bodies out there:  The American Board of Pediatrics certifies doctors in pediatrics and pediatric subspecialties.  The American Board of Internal Medicine certifies doctors in Internal Medicine (the care of adults) and related subspecialties.  Subspecialists such as pulmonologists (CF docs, for example) have received additional training in pulmonary medicine (either pediatric or adult) and are certified by either the American Board of Pediatrics or the American Board of Internal Medicine, depending on training.

As soon as I learned of the distinction between licensed doctors and board certified doctors, I went right to the American Board of Pediatrics' website to check to see if my children's doctors are Board Certified.  Thankfully, they all are.

I feel a bit of relief knowing that the doctors who care for Oliver, Bennett and Avonlea are board certified because board certification demonstrates that my children's doctors have spent extra time and resources to stay current in medicine and desire to provide the best quality patient care.  

The definition of a "good" doctor (other than that they do no harm) tends to be preferentially individual.  But what I appreciate most about the difference between a licensed doctor and a board certified doctor is that a certified doctor is held to higher standards in accountability and is required to regularly demonstrate he/she has furthered their medical education.  Most certainly, a licensed doctor may continue learning but there is no accountability to make sure they are.

While physicians who regularly take tests on new medical information can benefit patients, I don't believe it's just board certification knowledge that is important.  I think the benefit is beyond that. The value is in the process.

Learning doesn't happen by demonstrating that you know a fact once.  It happens when you repeatedly submit to a discipline over and over again and you are shaped in such a way that you naturally respond, without thinking, to certain events.

When my children's doctors become board certified, they indicate to me that they have chosen to seek continued education...chosen to participate in a community of doctors before him, with him and beyond him that are making the commitment to do the same thing...and are being formed by that process.

Board certification can be costly.  Many hospital systems don't pay for their doctors to take their boards so doctors themselves must pay for it out of pocket.  And board certification is not easy.  Board certification requires doctors take time away from their work and their family to study for their boards. The cost and time burden of board certification can be challenging considering many doctors are already overwhelmed by preauthorizations and electronic health record paperwork. Knowing this only makes me more grateful to the board certified doctors in our life who make so they can provide high quality care to my family.

Considering that board certification is a hot healthcare topic among doctors right now, I'm of the opinion that patients and families should know more about the topic of board certification so they too can join the discussion, for it's their health that is on the line.

In an effort to educate other parents about board certification, I recently shared my personal views on a video for https://www.mycertifiedpediatrician.org/, a website created for parents by the American Board of Pediatrics.  To watch the video, click here.

My having learned the value of board certification makes me even more appreciate all the extra time and money given on our behalf to improve patient care.

If you're a board certified doc, thank you!


One Response to “Dear Board Certified Doc, Thank You.”

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